Oregon passes 2,000 deaths; Oregon reports 846 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 5 new deaths; Tillamook County adds one case

www.tillamookcountypioneer.net

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are five new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 2,002, the Oregon Health Authority reported today February 5, 2021.

Oregon Health Authority reported 846 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19, bringing the state total to 146,138.

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported are in the following counties: Baker (1), Benton (20), Clackamas (42), Clatsop (6), Columbia (10), Coos (19), Crook (8), Curry (5), Deschutes (25), Douglas (26), Harney (9), Hood River (2), Jackson (36), Jefferson (16), Josephine (17), Klamath (4), Lake (15), Lane (83), Lincoln (9), Linn (20), Malheur (21), Marion (132), Morrow (5), Multnomah (136), Polk (15), Tillamook (1), Umatilla (31), Union (12), Wallowa (1), Wasco (4), Washington (92) and Yamhill (23).

COVID-19 related deaths top 2,000 in Oregon

“OHA is saddened today to report our 2,000th COVID-19 related death: a 90-year-old woman in Yamhill County who tested positive on Feb. 1 and died on Feb. 2 at her residence,” said OHA Director Patrick Allen. “At this stage of the pandemic, many of us have seen family, friends or neighbors die from COVID-19. Or we know people who have lost loved ones. Many of us at OHA grieve the loss of our own family or friends. Every loss weighs on us. I want to extend my deepest sympathies to every family who’s mourned a parent, sibling or child who died from a COVID-19 infection.”

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 22,724 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry. Of this total, 12,898 doses were administered on Feb. 4 and 9,826 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry on Feb. 4.

Cumulative daily totals can take several days to finalize because providers have 72 hours to report doses administered and technical challenges have caused many providers to lag in their reporting. OHA has been providing technical support to vaccination sites to improve the timeliness of their data entry into the state’s ALERT Immunization Information System (IIS).

Oregon has now administered a cumulative total of 509,582 first and second doses of COVID-19 vaccines. To date, 733,975 doses of vaccine have been delivered to sites across Oregon.

These data are preliminary and subject to change. OHA’s dashboards provide regularly updated vaccination data, and Oregon’s dashboard has been updated today.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 238, which is 23 fewer than yesterday. There are 59 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is one more than yesterday.

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Additional testing results added to daily totals

Due to a delay in laboratory reporting, OHA received more than 1,800 electronic laboratory results (ELRs) on Feb. 3. These newly added test results include information from Dec. 2, 2020 through Feb. 2. As a result, daily ELR totals and percent positivity are higher for Feb. 3 than usual in seven counties: Clackamas, Jefferson, Lake, Malheur, Marion, Multnomah and Umatilla.

Baker County moves from Extreme Risk to High Risk level

Baker County’s risk level will drop from Extreme Risk to High Risk, effective Feb. 5. In working with Baker County’s Local Public Health Authority, OHA found discrepancies in Baker County’s percent positivity data related to electronic laboratory results submitted from Idaho health systems. In addition, from Jan. 10 through Jan. 23, there were 12 adults in custody newly reported to have COVID-19. As these individuals do not interact with members of the broader community, the numbers are being subtracted from Baker County’s total cases of COVID-19 for determination of county risk level, bringing the number of cases in the two week period down to 54.

Based on the corrected data, Baker County was found to qualify for High Risk immediately. This move allows some businesses and facilities to resume offering indoor services with health and safety measures and capacity limits in place.

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our webpage, which has a breakdown of distribution and other useful information.