States add two days of Chinook retention at Buoy 10, two sturgeon retention days above Wauna

www.tillamookcountypioneer.net

CLACKAMAS, Ore.—Fishery managers decided to provide more Chinook retention opportunity for the Buoy 10 fishery on the Columbia River in time for Labor Day weekend when they met by conference call this week.
On Saturday Sept. 5 and Sunday Sept. 6, the daily bag limit from Buoy 10 upstream to Rocky Point – Tongue Point line may include two adult salmon (Chinook and hatchery coho), only one of which may be a Chinook. All wild coho and all steelhead must be released.
Beginning Monday, Sept. 7, only hatchery coho may be retained within the revised Buoy 10 daily adult bag limit of two fish. All Chinook, wild coho, and steelhead must be released. Chinook retention is currently expected to reopen Sept. 23 if the upriver bright Chinook return meets expectations.

Anglers are reminded that retention of jacks is also prohibited until Oct. 1 and all previously adopted salmon fishing regulations still apply. Get the details at the Columbia River Zone page, https://myodfw.com/recreation-report/fishing-report/columbia-zone

Fishery managers also today set two days of retention fishing for white sturgeon on Saturday, Sept. 12 and Saturday, Sept. 19 in the Columbia River upstream of the Wauna Powerlines (river mile 40 near the west end of Puget Island).
On those two days, anglers may retain white sturgeon on the mainstem Columbia River from the Wauna Powerlines upstream to Bonneville Dam.
The daily bag limit is one white sturgeon with a fork length of 44-50 inches. The annual bag limit is two fish including any sturgeon retained earlier in the year. Remember that fork length is measured in a straight line from the tip of the nose to the fork in the caudal fin (tail) with the fish laying on its side on a flat surface and the tape measure/ruler positioned flat under the fish. Single point barbless hooks are required for all sturgeon fishing.
The catch guideline for the fishery is 1,140 sturgeon. Fishery managers are taking a cautious approach, and may add additional retention days depending on catch rates, or close the second Saturday if the allowable catch is reached.
Fishery managers declined to add two sturgeon retention fishing days in the lower Columbia River estuary area. Oregon decided against it after hearing public testimony and opposition to idea from guides and anglers, who prefer to hold off on sturgeon fishing until next spring when there are much fewer fishing opportunities on the lower river and the economic impact will be greater. The potential for a 2021 spring season will be determined next year.
Fishery managers will meet again on Wednesday, Sept. 9 at 10 a.m. to get an update on salmon runs and consider more recreational fishing opportunity.
For the latest on Columbia River fishing regulations and opportunities, visit https://myodfw.com/recreation-report/fishing-report/columbia-zone